Research Guides


Research Guides

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Research Guides

New Policies in Effect

Please note that several new policy changes have gone into effect, effective 8/3/2015.

The changes are as follows:

  • Community members are granted access to designated computers and scanners with specified time limits.
  • No outside food may be brought into the Café or the Library. Food is not allowed in the North Hudson Library.
  • Children under the age of 16 are permitted in the Library, but must be supervised by a caregiver at all times. Children are not permitted to use Library computers.
  • Loitering is prohibited. Anyone asked to leave the Library by Security must comply.

Copies of current HCCC Library policies are always available in the Main and North Hudson Libraries, or online at http://www.hccclibrary.net/policies/ .

The Hudson County Community College Code of Conduct can be found at http://www.hccclibrary.net/conduct/

If you have questions about these changes, please contact Associate Dean for College Libraries Carol Van Houten at 201-360-4361 or cvanhouten@hccc.edu


Science Direct Unavailable 8/1

Please note that access to the Library’s Science Direct resources will be unavailable from 6-11 p.m. on 8/1 due to system upgrades.


E.L. Doctorow dies at 84

DoctorowThe author penned several books including Ragtime, The March, and Billy Bathgate. He is quoted in the New York Times Book section as saying, “Someone said to me once that my books can be arranged in rough chronological order to indicate one man’s sense of 120 years of American life. . .it seems I’ve finally caught up to the present.” Here is a list of books at the HCCC Libraries by and about E.L. Doctorow, and an interview with the author talking to George Plimpton, from the Paris Review.

 


Main Library Closing at 6pm Tonight

Please note that due to water service repairs, the Main Library will close at 6 p.m. tonight. Classes in the L building will be relocated.


Books

 

WeAreNotWe are Not Ourselves by Matthew Thomas

A strong woman character, Eileen, is married to a cerebral science professor, Ed, who disdains material opulence. This book shows the push and pull of marriage from magical first romance, to forking paths of jobs and ambitions, to final acceptance and resolve to stay together. An expert in brain function, Ed succumbs to early-onset Alzheimer’s. The struggle to maintain their live-style, emotionally, financially, and socially, create hills of defeat and defiance. Their son is little help.  As I was reading this novel, I wondered at the gentle insights the author shows so clearly, with descriptions of feeling that most stories don’t touch upon because they are so subtle. This is Thomas’s first novel, and I am so looking forward to reading more by him. ~Cynthia

PossibilitiesThe Possibilities by Kaui Hart Hemmings  PS3608.E477P67

A middle-age woman, a son who died young in an avalanche, a sarcastically wise grandfather, a divorcing best friend, and the girl who brings them all together through  pregnancy. Sounds trite, but I enjoyed the writing. Although the characters all tend to have the same sense of humor and irony, which isn’t much like real life. There is enough amusement balanced with a fine portrait of grief to make fiction lovers hold these characters close. This author also wrote The Descendant, which was made into a George Clooney movie. ~Cynthia

PublicShameSo You’ve Been Publicly Shamed by Jon Ronson HM661.R66
 
Ronson tells of the people in our internet society who have been caught telling tales, making bad jokes, impersonating others, who have been caught and made to face the wrath of online chatter. He mentions that the last physical public punishment was banned from American society back in the 1800’s. But, since tweeting and facebook are so easy to hide behind, now our shaming is done with impersonal words. Don’t know which punishment is more honest or worse weighing the repercussions of provincial corporal punishment compared to global emotional shaming. By this author’s opinion and research, the latter is the more devasting. ~Cynthia

Send us your book & film suggestions here!