Book [email protected] ~ Fall 2018

Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions written by Valeria Luiselli

Gabert Library – Tuesday, October 9th : 2:00-4:00pm
NHC Library – Thursday, October 11th : 1:00-3:00pm
A review of Tell Me How It Ends can be found here.

Please come by to sign up for the Book Club and get your free copy. Items will be limited to the first ten people.

The Book Club is held in Gabert Library’s Makerspace and NHC Library’s Group Study Room. Snacks will be provided as well as stimulating conversation!

Film: Mary Shelley directed by Haifaa AlMansour
Gabert Library-Tuesday, October 30th : 2:00-4:00pm
NHC Library-Thursday, November 1st : 3:00-5:00pm
A film clip of the movie can be found here.

Come watch the movie with us and find out about the woman who created Frankenstein, had a tumultuous marriage to poet Percy Shelley, and was the daughter of feminist writer Mary Wollstonecraft.

The film will be shown at Gabert Library’s Makerspace and NHC Library’s Group Study Room. As Halloween treats, we’ll provide the snacks!

In Search of Mary Shelley: The Girl Who Wrote Frankenstein written by Fiona Sampson

Gabert Library-Tuesday, November 13th : 2:00-4:00pm
NHC Library-Thursday, November 15th : 11:00am-1:00pm
A review of In Search of Mary Shelley can be found here.
 
Please come by and sign up for the Book Club and get your free copy. Items will be limited to the first ten people.

The Book Club is held in Gabert Library’s Makerspace and NHC Library’s Group Study Room. Snacks will be provided as well as scintillating conversation!

Send us your favorite book & film suggestions!

[email protected]

 

 

 

Charging Stations @Libraries

The Libraries have charging stations for your devices. Even if you don’t want to check out our charging cords, you can still power up.

Just be aware, any device left at these stations is the owner’s responsibility. The Library is not liable for any device misplaced or stolen.

Books I have read . . .

The Sea by John Banville ~ Main & NHC PR6052.A57S43

After reading Banville’s Ancient Light and Mrs. Osmond, I immediately went searching for all his other books. Banville is magic. He captivates and enlightens. I love his vocabulary, which teaches me new words to describe the world. But by the time I almost reached the end of this tome, I was tired of the details of emotional and psychological poetic analysis. I yearned for some action that the characters could clamor through without reminiscing about it later in the book.
“While the novel dwells meditatively on the childhood pursuits that dominated his summer, Max’s memories of the Graces also act as a springboard for more wide-ranging recollections about the ups and downs of his married life, the doomed relationship of his parents, and the tortuous death of his wife, Anna. Yet it is not the events themselves which are particularly noteworthy but Banville’s ability to tease out, in a prose that is never less than exquisitely wrought, the resonances in the commonplace which echo with amplified significance throughout an individual’s life” review by John Tague, Independent, 9/4/2005
Read an excerpt of The Sea here.

Send us your favorite book & film suggestions!

1 2 3 18